Heymes & Levavasseur, aides-de-camp to Maréchal Ney

Another blog update, hot on the heels of the Dark Age hovel but entirely different in theme and subject! When I told you I’d been engrossed by Napoleonics yet again, I wasn’t lying. Let’s take a look at the two chaps.

Another fantastic sculpt by the Perrys.

Another fantastic sculpt by the Perrys.

Both these models were part of the Maréchal Ney pack from Perry. I painted Ney first to function as my army’s commander and because he is by far the best sculpt in the pack – indeed one of the best Perry sculpts even in my book –  but his aides-de-camp are fantastic too. They’ve finally gotten some love now.

Unfortunately, the sabre was bent beyond repair.

Unfortunately, the sabre was bent beyond repair.

Although they share many colours and techniques, I painted the two models separately to ensure that they both got their full share of attention. Levavasseur was first, Heymes followed shortly after. Both were painted in just a few hours each.

The horrid close up shot, which reveals the crudeness of my brushstrokes.

The horrid close up shot, which reveals the crudeness of my brushstrokes.

One minor divergence is that I added an extra highlight stage to my usual skin painting technique – an extra final highlight of flayed one flesh. If I were a better painter, I’d be able to do a lot more with this paint as it is an excellent light skin tone. Not too yellow, not too pink.

My favourite of the two sculpts.

My favourite of the two sculpts.

Both models were great to paint up, but Levavasseur just a little bit more than Heymes. It’s not just the pose, it’s also the challenge that lay in recreating the uniform with enough contrast. The light blue turnbacks and cuffs needed to be distinct from the darker blue of the coat itself, and the middle grey pantaloons from the lighter grey of the horse. This turned out rather well in the end, I believe.

Missed an area - the strap on his left arm. Back to the painting table it is.

Missed an area – the strap on his left arm. Back to the painting table it is.

The red bandolier and gold braiding works excellently to offset all these cold colours. All this blue, gold and red was actually washed purple before adding in subsequent highlights – it works well on all these areas and a single universally applied wash cuts down immensely on drying times.

"Chargez!"

“Chargez!”

 

Et voilà – another two backlog models finished. This brings the 2013 counter to a nice round 280. I’m not sure whether I’ll be able to make it to 300 by the end of July, but I’ll try. Coming up is a company of 12 Dutch musketeers for that battalion of Eighty Years War soldiers. More on them soon enough!

 

 

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