Category: War of the Spanish Succession

Swiss Regiment Erlach Emmanuel

Despite my comments to the contrary, I’ve taken up a commission recently – and finished it in four days. I only managed to take pictures of half the unit, as the second batch was completed just an hour before handing them over to the owner.

All models by Ebor, and sculpted by Paul Hicks.

All models by Ebor, and sculpted by Paul Hicks.

How did I paint 24 models in four days? Well, look at the models’ foot tabs. With the majority of their uniforms being red, I decided to use a mephiston red spraycan from GW to undercoat them. This red was drybrushed with wild rider red, and the blue parts were basecoated caledor sky, followed by a purple wash over the entire model. That’s half the model already!

 

Not much variety in the sculpts, which helped things along as well.

Not much variety in the sculpts, which helped things along as well.

After that, the browns were mainly just basecoats of different tones with an agrax earthshade wash over it all. The white buttons were rather fiddly, but with ceramite white it’s never really an issue.

The owner is going to base these and add the right flags, so maybe the completely finished unit will grace this blog in the future. We’re gearing up for a Blenheim wargame sometime this year, and there’s still plenty of regiments to be finished; I think I’ll be doing some more of these infantry soonish!

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Austrian Generals for a Friend

Huzzah, another blog update, and this one commemorates the conclusion of a commission piece. I believe the commissioner and his wargaming friends were satisfied with the paintjobs, and so there will be more commission pieces forthcoming. It’ll be a while before I can show you the two Bavarian generals which preceeded these Austrians (and it’s the Bavarian models I’m most proud of, really) but I hope these will sate your WSS appetites. Here goes.

The one on the left is by Front Rank, the other is by Foundry.

The one on the left is by Front Rank, the other is by Foundry.

These two chaps were painted over the course of a single day, with numerous breaks in the painting. Not bad for a single day’s work then, I’d say. The painting sequence was largely identical to that of the French general (see my painting guide for pointers), excepting of course the less copious purple washes.

 

As always, the Foundry models are 'classic' 25mm while other companies have slowly shifted to 28mm.

As always, the Foundry models are ‘classic’ 25mm while other companies have slowly shifted to 28mm.

The only area on these models worth mentioning are the green saddlecloths and sashes. These were basecoated waaagh! flesh (oh my goodness), washed with drakenhof nightshade, then highlighted first with the base colour and then with warboss green. I think it came out nicely – I wanted to avoid too pale or too yellow a green.

So there you go. As you can see I’m trying to catch up with my blog posts. Expect at least two more before the end of the weekend!

How to paint a French WSS General

By request of several of my faithful readers, I’ve put together a painting guide which showcases some of the painting techniques I use. As I’m working on a commission involving several mounted generals for the War of the Spanish Succession, this is the subject I’ll be handling today. More painting guides will be offered in the future.

Disclaimer: This model was photographed at various locations with differing lighting situations and with two different cameras, and as a result the pictures vary immensely in quality. Nevertheless, I hope they will do their job of illustrating my painting techniques.

Step one.

Step one.

To start off: I’ve undercoated the model white, and then given it a wash of seraphim sepia. This immediately brings out all the detail on the model, which I find immeasurably useful for models with high degrees of detail; the various layers of clothing on this model, especially on the breast, are thus easy to identify.

Step two.

Step two.

Next up we have the block or basecoat painting stage, where the major colours are all painted in. I’ve used mournfang brown on the horse and rhinox brown on the muzzle, mane, tail and socks. The skintone was painted bugman’s glow, and the tunic has been painted mephiston red and caledor sky. It’s not looking too well right now, but that’s about to change.

Step three.

Step three.

Washes! Most areas of the model have been shaded with a selection of washes. The skin has been washed with reikland fleshshade, the blue areas and trousers with drakenhof nightshade, and the horse with agrax earthshade for the light brown and nuln oil for the dark brown areas. Check out the combination of sepia and blue inks: a nice grey appears, which will soon be highlighted.

Step four.

Step four.

Speaking of highlights: here we go! The horse has been worked up with first mournfang brown and then skrag brown. The leather areas were painted black then starkly highlighted with codex grey. As well as these finishing touches, the gold detailing was basecoated gehenna’s gold, and the telescope was basecoated hashut copper (unfortunately the latter wasn’t captured on camera). And the skin, of course: three successive highlighting steps of cadian fleshtone, kislev flesh and flayed one flesh. Already looking a lot better, isn’t it?

Step five.

Step five.

At this stage, a major wash of druchii violet was applied to all blue, red and gold areas at once. I’m a major fan of purple washing, especially over gold, as it produces a very crisp shading result. As well as this, a black wash was painted over all the leatherwork to reduce the starkness of those grey highlights.

 

Step six: finale!

Step six: finale!

And then we’re on to the final highlights! The blue was highlighted again with caledor sky, the red with evil sunz scarlet (I still feel stupid typing that) and the gold with sycorax bronze. The white detailing was, of course, done with ceramite white.

The back of this Front Rank miniature.

The back of this Front Rank miniature.

The hair, by the way, is a simple coat of rakarth flesh followed by an agrax earthshade wash. Didn’t want to spend too much time on that anymore.

And there you go: that’s one painted French general for you. Interesting trivia: this model is actually the Duke of Marlborough by Front Rank Miniatures; the commissioner didn’t want him painted up as such but as a French, Austrian or Bavarian general. Naturally, I went and made him a Frenchman, because that’s how wicked I am!

I hope you found this guide a bit helpful; if you have any other questions regarding this guide, do comment. And let me know which guides you would like to see me do in the future; there’s one I might do for my Dacians in the near future but I’m open for suggestions.