Tagged: foundry

The Final Gladiators (For Now)

I’ve got my first batch of Jugula games under my belt, so I thought it was high time to vary things up a bit – so I’ve added the final gladiators in my collection to the fray.

 

All models by Wargames Foundry.

All models by Wargames Foundry.

From left to right we have Remus the Sabine provocator, Brutus the Etrurian crupellarius, Melqart the Libyan murmillo, and Clodia the female thraex. As any knowledgeable person will see, several of these gladiators’ armaturae don’t correspond to their class – I just had to find some use for the models so I went with whatever suited my two ludi best.

 

I might add some small freehand patterns to these models in the future.

I might add some small freehand patterns to these models in the future.

They’re another colourful bunch – I purposely did this to set them apart from each other and to offer variety to my paintjob. Still, they were on my painting desk far too long. I’m happy to have them done as a collection, although I might add a blister or two to them in the near future – Jugula is just that much fun.

Next update: still not sure!

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More Gladiators

I’m really itching to play my first game of Jugula so I’ve proceeded to paint the second ludus for my collection. I don’t have too much to say about them, so I’ll let the pictures do (most of) the talking.

 

Two Crusader Miniatures models, and two Wargames Foundry models.

Two Crusader Miniatures models, and two Wargames Foundry models.

From the left we have Pontius the Roman, Hanno the Numidian, Oengus the Celt and Albus the Nubian. Two Africans to get the multiculturality of the Roman Empire across.

 

I like the highlights I've managed on their loincloths.

I like the highlights I’ve managed on their loincloths.

As I said in my previous blog post, I’ve too many secutores and retiarii so I’ve included one of each in this ludus. The other two are Wargames Foundry models from another blister I picked up at Crisis ’14 – a Murmillo and a Thraex.

Off to the gaming table now! I’ve got plenty more stuff on the desk in a rudimentary phase, so who knows what’s next. Tah!

More Dacian Falxmen

I said my Dacian & Sarmatian army was finished, but then I got talking with my very generous friend Eddy about his own Dacians and he simply donated me some of his overstock. Another awesome treat, except for the fact that I have had to reopen the project. Still, it’s been some time since I’ve painted the outlandish colour scheme, so I chose to get to it straight away.

Models by Wargames Foundry, for a change.

Models by Wargames Foundry, for a change.

I really haven’t painted that many Wargames Foundry models yet, so I was doubly glad to have another crack at them. These models are a bit smaller than their Warlord Games counterparts, but their poses are a bit more natural. Overall they’re good sculpts with the right amount of detail, and the casting quality on my batch was top notch.

Two command groups, to be spread across the smaller units we currently field.

Two command groups, to be spread across the smaller units we currently field.

One major departure from the previous paintjobs for the project is that, for these guys, I used an Army Painter barbarian flesh basecoat spray instead of white. One more corner cut that way! I also decided to vary the palette ever so slightly by switching out blue horror for fenrisian grey with a purple wash. Other than that, just the standard fare.

So that’s yet more stuff done and I’m nearing the 800 figure mark for 2014. Capital!

 

 

Régiment de Dragons du Dauphin

Sometimes you just have to clench your teeth and paint on despite a healthy dislike of the model(s) on your desk – I’m sure all of you miniature painters reading this will be able to relate. For me, the models below were quite a chore to get done. New problems kept cropping up during painting, which made me throw down my brushes and wander off more than once. Still, they’re done and ready to be shown.

Models by Foundry - just one sculpt for the troopers makes for tedious painting.

Models by Foundry – just one sculpt for the troopers makes for tedious painting.

As you can witness from the (temporary) bases, I used my new Army Painter undercoat sprays on the horses – fur brown, desert yellow and leather brown – and white and black too, obviously. Not having to basecoat them by hand saves a bit of time – I just slapped on an agrax earthshade wash and then highlighted them with deathclaw brown, zandri dust and gorthor brown respectively. Same for the riders: a guilliman blue undercoat sped them up as well.

 

wssdragoons2

I took the time to add some woodgrain to their carbines.

From then on, it was supposed to be straightforward, but the models somehow didn’t react favourably to my brush strokes. It’s hard to explain, but I kept on making mistakes, accidentally painting over previous work or forgetting to paint certain bits. Still, I’m glad they turned out well. They’ll look better once the owner rebases them on 25x50mm format bases – these are just temporary – and adds the correct flag.

With this unit finished, the War of the Spanish Succession output will be placed on hold for the time being – I’ve too much of my own lead-and-plastic pile that requires my attention, plus some Gripping Beast crusaders for another friend. But keep your eyes peeled, because this evening I’ll put another blog post up!

Austrian Generals for a Friend

Huzzah, another blog update, and this one commemorates the conclusion of a commission piece. I believe the commissioner and his wargaming friends were satisfied with the paintjobs, and so there will be more commission pieces forthcoming. It’ll be a while before I can show you the two Bavarian generals which preceeded these Austrians (and it’s the Bavarian models I’m most proud of, really) but I hope these will sate your WSS appetites. Here goes.

The one on the left is by Front Rank, the other is by Foundry.

The one on the left is by Front Rank, the other is by Foundry.

These two chaps were painted over the course of a single day, with numerous breaks in the painting. Not bad for a single day’s work then, I’d say. The painting sequence was largely identical to that of the French general (see my painting guide for pointers), excepting of course the less copious purple washes.

 

As always, the Foundry models are 'classic' 25mm while other companies have slowly shifted to 28mm.

As always, the Foundry models are ‘classic’ 25mm while other companies have slowly shifted to 28mm.

The only area on these models worth mentioning are the green saddlecloths and sashes. These were basecoated waaagh! flesh (oh my goodness), washed with drakenhof nightshade, then highlighted first with the base colour and then with warboss green. I think it came out nicely – I wanted to avoid too pale or too yellow a green.

So there you go. As you can see I’m trying to catch up with my blog posts. Expect at least two more before the end of the weekend!

French Generals for a Friend

Hello you good people! First of all I should apologise for the lack of recent updates. I was working on two companies of Napoleonic light infantry just before and after my vacation, and just before they were finished I decided to commence work on another commission, the results of which you can witness below. Rest assured that I will do my best to finish those Napoleonics by the end of the coming weekend and show them to you – but don’t get your hopes up too high because I have a wedding to attend on Saturday and I predict a massive hangover on Sunday. But enough of that, let’s take a look at today’s offering.

 

Classic (and classy!) models by Wargames Foundry.

Classic (and classy!) models by Wargames Foundry.

As said, these three chaps are part of a small commission of a total of eight mounted models. They’re early 18th century French generals, War of the Spanish Succession types. I have to be honest: I know next to nothing of that war apart from there being a ridiculous amount of tricorn hats and lace. There’s one more Frenchman coming and then some Bavarians and Austrians I believe. The commissioner was kind enough to provide me with some helpful pictures both of painted models and of portrait paintings of generals of the age.

 

The pictures came out slightly bluish - that's what you get for using morning light!

The pictures came out slightly bluish – that’s what you get for using morning light!

Nevertheless I did vary the dress of these generals while keeping the palette unified. From the information I’ve gathered, the man on the right is wearing the ‘regulation uniform’ for a general of the age, although it was rarely worn. The one in the middle wears red which features in plenty of portrait paintings, and the one on the left wears white as a nod to good old pre-revolutionary France. Uniformity was rather uncommon back then, after all.

 

You can see the white in a little more detail here. Nice teeth, too.

You can see the white in a little more detail here. Nice teeth, too.

Painting-wise, I combined a few of my stock techniques on these models. They were undercoated white and then washed seraphim sepia to bring out all the detail. Blue, red and gold were block painted, altogether washed purple and then highlighted with the respective colours. Something new I did was the basecoat for the white parts: instead of slapping on some grey or off-white I just washed these parts with drakenhof nightshade. The blue and sepia washes conspired to produce a nice bluish grey which proved a blast to highlight onto.

A final picture of their mugs.

A final picture of their mugs.

That about does it for this blog update. You can see a paint chip or two on these guys already which I touched up after the pictures were taken, and now they’re safely stored to be delivered to the commissioner this evening. A one-week turnaround for three generals – not too bad I’d say!

Next up is a fourth Frenchman for the same project and those Napoleonics. I’ve also received the last batch of Sarmatians, so a few cataphracts might pass the painting table too next week. Stay safe, San Diego!