Tagged: general

Franks of a Different Stripe

More Franks were painted over the course of the last few weeks, but as you’ll see they’re nothing like the previous lot. These are Carolingian Franks from Gripping Beast, and they’re a commission from my friend Alex.

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First up, the Warlord. He’s the more colourful of the lot, and I gave him a white horse to stand out that much more.

 

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Two points of mounted Hearthguard. These were also done rather colourfully. I had a good time mixing and matching colours on different garments to make each model unique.

 

 

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A point of mounted Warriors. For these lower-ranked guys I opted for simple, neutral colours on their garments but then made the shields stand out. cofcof

Finally, two points of foot Warriors. As with their mounted comrades I used neutral tones on the garments, and as you can see from their bases I used four different undercoat sprays which would form the base of the models’ tunics. That certainly sped up the painting process!

I’ve just completed painting the last of these models this morning and I’ll be handing them over tomorrow evening. I’m glad to be shot of them, as that means I can focus on my own lead pile again!

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Marshall Vorwärts and his Comrades

It’s not every day a Napoleonic personality graces the blog, so harken! Those Prussians I have been working on for Henk for a while now finally have a set of commanders to lead them, with none other than Blücher at the helm. Let’s take a looksie.

Lovely models by Perry Miniatures.

Lovely models by Perry Miniatures.

I’m very glad to have been able to paint these models as they were an absolute treat – but you wouldn’t expect otherwise from Perry Miniatures, right? Just look at Blücher’s massive pipe! Reminds me of Christopher Waltz’ character in the opening scene of Tarantino’s Inglourious Basterds.

I started off these models from different brown undercoat sprays, as I wanted to tackle the horses first. It was a toss-up between that and the usual blue undercoat, but I’m glad I went for browns. Lots of time saved.

The brigadier on the right somehow ended up looking like Ringo Starr.

The brigadier on the right somehow ended up looking like Ringo Starr.

These are focal models for the army, so I took more care with these models than with the ordinary rankers – an extra highlight layer here and there, primarily on the blue and the skin, makes everything pop just a bit more. Of course we’ll have to wait for the commissionaire to base them before their true beauty is revealed, but just look at those characterful poses!

That’s it for today! I have a final batch of Prussian musketeers which I’ll commence with soonish, but other than that I have a lot more material for blog posts which I’ll be covering over the weekend. So stay tuned, and auf wiedersehen!

 

Federico da Montefeltro

In among the ‘samey’ commission projects I have going is this wonderful little breath of fresh air. Federico da Montefeltro, a knight of the Duke of Urbino. He’ll be commanding my wargaming compatriot Carl’s Venetian forces in future battles.

A metal and a plastic model by Perry Miniatures.

A metal and a plastic model by Perry Miniatures.

Carl supplied me with a depiction of the heraldry to be painted onto the barding and such, and I really enjoyed painting this – quite different from my usual freehands.

 

Great plastic horses, these.

Great plastic horses, these.

These are the first late medieval models for the blog, but they won’t be the last – I have a box of plastic Perry knights waiting in the wings. They probably won’t be lavished in this way, though.

That’s it for today – I’m off to Cambridge with the in-laws tomorrow. Tally ho!

 

Late Roman General

Vignettes are something I indulge in far too little, given the time and effort I devote to figure painting. Sure, I crank out plenty of models each month, but some aspects of my creativity are left underused in the process. Time, then, to redress the balance! I’ve really grown to like these Late Roman models – what’s not to like about them? – and I reckoned I’d award those comitatenses and limitanei with a suitable general.

 

All models by Gripping Beast.

All models by Gripping Beast.

There were no marked commanders in the bag of lead I took over from my wargaming compatriot Eddy, so I had a rifle through the different contents and found one among a scorpio crew. Ornate helmet? Check. Heroically draped cloak? Check. Pointing into the distance? Check! Also I found out there were musicians in among the set only after I’d put together the first two infantry units, so I decided to leave them be and to use these horn blowers as heralds for the general. He’s a very important chap, y’know.

 

Honk!

Honk!

I further decided to mark him out by giving him a lot more colour than the other models in the force. A cloak in imperial purple was a given, and a turquoise helmet plume seems to contrast excellently with all the gold on the models. No special treatment was given to his entourage.

 

Uncle Stilicho wants YOU!

Uncle Stilicho wants YOU!

I mounted him on a 60mm mdf base from www.laserbases.be so he can be used both in skirmishes and in battles like Chalôns – speaking of which, it’s less than a month from now! Crikey! I’d like to add at least one further unit to the army by that time, probably archers, but time permitting I’ll do some cataphracts as well. We’ll see.

Up next: Arabs and Dacian shamen.

A Scotsman on a Horse!

 

My father-in-law being a huge Monty Python fan (and I am, too) I thought this would be a nice little Christmas present for him:

Originally Lord Levin, by Warlord Games.

Originally Lord Leven, by Warlord Games.

This is the first time I’ve had to paint tartans and I have had to experiment with them. I’ve mostly followed the clothing John Cleese wears in the sketch, although the actual outfit of the model is somewhat different.

Another look at the two different tartans.

Another look at the two different tartans.

In absence of decent natural lighting conditions I’ve had to take recourse to a few desk lamps set up in different angles. Not so very pretty, unfortunately.

Up next: an official price list for my commission painting services for 2015. Spam!

How to paint a French WSS General

By request of several of my faithful readers, I’ve put together a painting guide which showcases some of the painting techniques I use. As I’m working on a commission involving several mounted generals for the War of the Spanish Succession, this is the subject I’ll be handling today. More painting guides will be offered in the future.

Disclaimer: This model was photographed at various locations with differing lighting situations and with two different cameras, and as a result the pictures vary immensely in quality. Nevertheless, I hope they will do their job of illustrating my painting techniques.

Step one.

Step one.

To start off: I’ve undercoated the model white, and then given it a wash of seraphim sepia. This immediately brings out all the detail on the model, which I find immeasurably useful for models with high degrees of detail; the various layers of clothing on this model, especially on the breast, are thus easy to identify.

Step two.

Step two.

Next up we have the block or basecoat painting stage, where the major colours are all painted in. I’ve used mournfang brown on the horse and rhinox brown on the muzzle, mane, tail and socks. The skintone was painted bugman’s glow, and the tunic has been painted mephiston red and caledor sky. It’s not looking too well right now, but that’s about to change.

Step three.

Step three.

Washes! Most areas of the model have been shaded with a selection of washes. The skin has been washed with reikland fleshshade, the blue areas and trousers with drakenhof nightshade, and the horse with agrax earthshade for the light brown and nuln oil for the dark brown areas. Check out the combination of sepia and blue inks: a nice grey appears, which will soon be highlighted.

Step four.

Step four.

Speaking of highlights: here we go! The horse has been worked up with first mournfang brown and then skrag brown. The leather areas were painted black then starkly highlighted with codex grey. As well as these finishing touches, the gold detailing was basecoated gehenna’s gold, and the telescope was basecoated hashut copper (unfortunately the latter wasn’t captured on camera). And the skin, of course: three successive highlighting steps of cadian fleshtone, kislev flesh and flayed one flesh. Already looking a lot better, isn’t it?

Step five.

Step five.

At this stage, a major wash of druchii violet was applied to all blue, red and gold areas at once. I’m a major fan of purple washing, especially over gold, as it produces a very crisp shading result. As well as this, a black wash was painted over all the leatherwork to reduce the starkness of those grey highlights.

 

Step six: finale!

Step six: finale!

And then we’re on to the final highlights! The blue was highlighted again with caledor sky, the red with evil sunz scarlet (I still feel stupid typing that) and the gold with sycorax bronze. The white detailing was, of course, done with ceramite white.

The back of this Front Rank miniature.

The back of this Front Rank miniature.

The hair, by the way, is a simple coat of rakarth flesh followed by an agrax earthshade wash. Didn’t want to spend too much time on that anymore.

And there you go: that’s one painted French general for you. Interesting trivia: this model is actually the Duke of Marlborough by Front Rank Miniatures; the commissioner didn’t want him painted up as such but as a French, Austrian or Bavarian general. Naturally, I went and made him a Frenchman, because that’s how wicked I am!

I hope you found this guide a bit helpful; if you have any other questions regarding this guide, do comment. And let me know which guides you would like to see me do in the future; there’s one I might do for my Dacians in the near future but I’m open for suggestions.