Tagged: khorne

Mr. Magore’s Khornate Emporium

Or, as they are known to most, Magore’s Fiends from the Warhammer Underworlds: Shadespire game. It’s actually really, really good! The game is fast-paced, noob-friendly but deep enough, and cheap to pick up – although you’d probably want to have all expansions just for the cards.

So, with that in mind, here are my paintjobs for one of the last to have been released warbands.

dav

First up we have Mr. Magore himself. I have elected to paint him up just like the rest of my Chaos models, in a colour scheme I first used on a Beastmen army years back (and whose whereabouts are currently unknown to me…).

 

 

dav

Old colour scheme means old paints! For instance, I used macharius solar orange on the armour, scorched brown on things like the bases and the fur, and trusty blood red on this cloak. Likewise, the skin was painted tallarn flesh, dwarf flesh and elf flesh.

dav

Unlike my old Beastmen, I did decide to add some more colour to the palette, so I used a sotek green – temple guard blue – baharroth blue triad on some spot details. I think this came out best on Magore’s chest cavity.

cof

Finally, I opted to do something a little different with the flesh hound, so I used that spot colour as the basis of its colour scheme. The colours were successively drybrushed over a dark blue undercoat and finally glazed with coelia greenshade. I did go back in to highlight a few key areas with baharroth blue. Incidentally, the glowing effect on the eyes was completely unintentional and a happy byproduct of my clumsiness – I had painted the eyes white and skipped, so I decided to turn it yellow. I used an old brush to then apply a casandora yellow glaze, but applied way too much, flooding the entire eye socket. It ended up looking like this entirely by accident!

Hope you liked this post! I’m going to have a big update on a little Ancients project soon, so stay tuned.

 

 

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Warhammer Beastlord

While recently rummaging through a couple of boxes in search of something entirely unrelated, I happened upon a Beastman model from years back. As you might have surmised already, something deeply nostalgic began to tingle in my gut – reminiscences of trackless hours hunched over plastic GW crack, slaving away with paints like elf flesh, blood red and the iconic vomit brown. In the end I decided to place this man-goat in between my current historical work and, at last, here he is.

 

Model by Games Workshop (of course)

Model by Games Workshop (of course)

First off – if it were any other GW model I’d have left him in that box, but with a pose like that you can’t say no. To me, this model is a perfect illustration of GW’s heyday. Back in the mid-2000s they were bringing out sensible plastic kits but still recognised the value of white metal for character models. They still had actual sculptors working for them instead of today’s lazy underpaid manchildren with an Autocad degree. I can’t help but think that a lot of the commitment to making great models is lost when the sculptor no longer has the actual 3-up in his hands to connect with – it’s a bit like the ethical discussion regarding army drone operators, albeit with less dead civilians.

 

A fantastic but natural pose

A fantastic but natural pose

Painting-wise, it’s a bit of a hybrid in that I used as many of the old GW range as I had lying around, but had to make do with using several of the new paints. For example I’ve used the old macharius solar orange for the orange armour plates, but washed them with the newer shades. I think it came out slightly darker than before, but overall I’m pleased with the effect. I’ve also decided that the old skin tones are flat out better when unmixed; dwarf flesh is much more vibrant than cadian fleshtone and kislev flesh is too light of a tone for final highlights as opposed to elf flesh. Hence I’ve used the old range skin tones on this model.

 

Whammy!

Whammy!

One problem is that I’ve managed to misplace my huge bag of yellowy-looking static grass, so I currently can’t finish the base. Still, it’s playable at the moment, so I’ve no qualms about that bit of detail. It’s a shame that ‘playable’ no longer means a thing, though, because Warhammer Fantasy seems to have completely died down in my gaming circles. Years of mismanagement on GW’s part, with the End Times as the final (overpriced, gold-trimmed) nails in the coffin. We’ll have to see how the next edition will pan out.

That’s it for today! I have another update ready for you tomorrow, and it’s going to be an even bigger shocker than this one… So check back soon, dear readers, and adieu!

Warhammer Bloodletters of Khorne

As promised, here is the second segment of my synopsis of the past week’s work. Ten infantry and six cavalry in a week means the painted model counter is nearing the 300 mark. I might even reach it at the end of this month, although I do have a ten-day vacation to Slovenia coming up which means I won’t be painting for about a third of July. We’ll see how that goes – let’s return to the topic at hand:

Plastic models by Games Workshop

Plastic models by Games Workshop

These fellows have been lying around in the back of my car since my birthday (16 February) which means they’ve had to wait half a year to get even the slightest bit of attention – even acknowledgement – from me. The reason for this is, of course, that I’ve since been dragged into many different historical projects, and my Warhammer stuff has remained largely untouched. Still, I wanted to do something non-human for a change, and for that purpose I decided to build and paint these guys.

As you can see, ranking them up is quite tricky.

As you can see, ranking them up is quite tricky.

These models are a fairly new GW kit, and as far as options go I’m a bit disappointed with them. GW used to cram lots of bits and bobs into the kit to personalise the models or to convert other models, but apart from choosing between command options or regular swords you have not a single extra part in this kit. Ten bodies, ten heads, ten faces, ten swords. Quite a shame, as I was thinking of using the spare parts together with Chaos Warriors to kitbash some Forsaken. The arms also go onto the bodies in just one way, so while the poses are rather varied, you can’t be creative with them.

Great lighting, Laurens, excellent...

Great lighting, Laurens, excellent…

I really didn’t want to spend a lot of time on these guys, so I built them in an hour and then painted them on Friday in a single day. Most of the time was spent waiting for the washes to dry – the orange was painted macharius solar orange and washed agrax earthshade then carroburg crimson, and the silver was painted runefang steel washed with Vallejo smoky ink and drakenhof nightshade. I’m not completely sold on the red swords, they were painted blood red, washed agrax earthshade and carroburg crimson as well, and then edge highlighted with blood red again. The contrast isn’t superb, so I think I’m going to look for a bright orange tone and do an extra highlight.

These are the only Daemon models in my possession at the moment, and I’m going to keep it that way for a bit. They were the flavour-of-the-month army recently so I might be able to get some second-hand deals in the near future, but I’ll not actively look for them – too many other exciting historical projects to consider!

As for next week: a couple more Napoleonics, with Maréchal Ney’s aides-de-camp, Heymes and Levavasseur, in the pipeline. And a scenery item, too!

Chaos Knights of Khorne

The sun shines, the spring blossoms sway in the breeze, and I’m at the office tending to the needs of undeserving people. In other words: High time for another blog update!

Since I have all these painted models lying about from previous projects that have that look in their (crookedly painted) eyes of “Please photograph me master, I love you master” I’ve decided to kick off a weekly series of updates about an old paintjob of mine. Henceforth, let’s call it Yesteryear Wednesday. Cute, isn’t it. As it’s been awhile since I’ve posted some Warhammer Fantasy stuff, let’s kick off with a unit of Chaos Knights.

These models were also photographed by Bo of GW Gent.

These models were also photographed by Bo of GW Gent.

This unit is the first, and currently only, of a Khorne-themed army which is to form part of a Grand Host of Chaos as per the Tamurkhan rules. For this reason, I chose to paint them with the same colours and techniques as my Beastmen which you’ve probably seen before on the blog. While the kit itself is really great, with lots of individuality to the five models, I slightly converted the models with Beastmen weapons and shields, and with heads from the regular Chaos Warriors. I wanted them to look slightly more feral to have them tie in better with the Beastmen themselves.

One of the better kits GW has released in recent years, decently priced too.

One of the better kits GW has released in recent years, decently priced too.

Painting was relatively straightforward, with most of the models being covered in metal. This was basecoated with macharius solar orange, washed with devlan mud and baal red, and then edged and weathered in one go with mithril silver. I wanted to do an orange army for the longest time, and it’s a relatively simple technique so I’m quite pleased with it. I really should get going with some more Chaos on the painting table, but it seems historicals have taken over; I’ve hardly painted a Warhammer Fantasy model since these Chaos Knights, last summer.

Speaking of knights: the Sarmatians are nearing completion. They won’t be done today or tomorrow, but I’ll certainly have them done by the end of the week. Until then!