Tagged: plastic

Carthaginian War Elephants

Through some not-so-subtly-dropped hints I got a few superb presents for my birthday. One of these was a copy of the WAB supplement Hannibal and the Punic Wars which she managed to find cheaply on Ebay, and, well, what’s the first word that comes to mind when you think of Hannibal?


These are the new plastic elephants from Victrix ltd. A great product – besides obviously being plastic and thus a treat to assemble, it comes with plenty of options for Ptolemaic, Roman, Numidian and, of course, Carthaginian versions. For me, that’s great – I used the linothorax-armoured riders with Carthaginian heads, but I can also use the Roman bodies in chainmail as veterans or Latin deserters, and the Numidians as allied infantry. Great!


I used the Little Big Men Studios decals as they are simply lovely – I can freehand, but not to anywhere near the level I’d need for this kind of patterning! A word on this to those readers who are interested in doing the same: It’s much, much easier to apply the decals before you affix the tower to the elephants. I had to cut down the decals on the ‘saddle cloth’ and had a lot of trouble getting the smaller ones to stick where they had to.


Other than that, painting was straighforward. The crew were painted identically to my other Carthaginians (more news on those soon, I hope), but the elephants were, naturally, rather a different matter. I drybrushed a dark grey and then a middle grey over a black undercoat. This looked crap, so I went in with the middle grey again but applied it as a layer highlighted, in angled streaks so as to get the right skin texture. The edge of the ears received a small layered highlight of medium skin tone applied directly over the grey, before everything was washed agrax earthshade.

Overall I had a great time painting them, even though it took nearly a month of on-and-off work! Right before they were done I already played a WAB battle with them, and they were quite effective. WAB is the reason why I decided to base them on 50x50mm bases; for those games which specify a unit breadth of 12cm I’ll prepare a bare 20x50mm base to put in between the two models.

There! Hope you like these as much as I do. I’ll have more Carthaginians ready in a bit, so there might be more Ancients on the blog very soon.

Ceterum censeo Duvel esse bibendam!


Ghosts/Wraiths/Spirits/Banshees for Frostgrave

Just a quick update, but a much overdue one – it’s been more than two months since my last post! I’ve been painting plenty of stuff and a new article of mine will soon be appearing in Warlord’s newsletter; these things, rather than this blog, has been taking up much of my time. It’ll only be a short update, this – the food is on the stove and I’ve just come in from a quick jog, so I’ll have to keep it brief! On to the models, then:


My mate Flor and I have recently started up a Frostgrave campaign using the Thaw of the Lich Lord scenarios and random encounter table, and as I noticed there were plenty of monsters of the ethereal kind, I’ve gone and added a box’s worth of these GW Spirit Hosts to my collection.

First off: these are an absolute nightmare to build. The different ghostly tentacles have to be glued together at specific locations where they pass eachother, at very minute contact points which are not at all clear to identify. These joins end up being very brittle, and if you don’t line them up 100% correctly you’ll then have trouble gluing the heads on – the ‘hairs’ will start interlocking means the heads won’t fit. These Spirit Hosts are quite possibly the worst plastic kit I’ve ever had to assemble in my fifteen years of hobby experience.

Still, once painting got underway, I had a lot of fun. Over a white undercoat I basecoated gauss blaster green, then sybarite green, then kabalite green, but I applied these basecoats increasingly away from the face, arms and tips of the lower ‘bodies’, effectively creating a transitional effect from white to a middle dark green. The weapons were basecoated silver, and after this I washed the models entirely in coelia greenshade. Once dry I applied white highlights to the faces, arms and ‘tails’ to bring the detail back on them, and I applied a sepia wash to the skeletons on the bases. The sand on the bases was painted dark brown and then both the bases and the skeletons were given a white drybrush. It’s so simple, which is also why I like them so much I decided to show them to you.

I’d like to do more of these, but someone else will have to assemble them for me…


With my Late Romans so close to completion I’ve given in to the allure of another ancients project… the flesh is weak! Spurred on by the release of Victrix’ Iberian infantry the Punic wars are a hot topic in our club, and I am the only one to have chosen the armies of Carthage.

I’ve picked up a box of Victrix Carthaginians, which will form the backbone of my collection, and I’ve added a number of extra command groups from Crusader Miniatures as well as cavalry from the latter. Of course I’ve also purchased the Hannibal foot and mounted model; the former will be converted into a Libyan captain of sorts. Let’s get on with this post and look at the first unit!


The middle base has a bog standard Crusader Miniatures command group, those on the left and right are Victrix plastics. As you can see the Vixtrix models are slightly taller and certainly more active looking, but otherwise they fit in fine.


I’ve painted these over a red undercoat – I was expecting to paint them with a lot more red, but eventually I used a lot more colours on these to keep them lively. As a definite first I’ve used plenty of pictorial reference material, mainly in the form of a couple of Ospreys I managed to pick up on the cheap!


Traditionally I’ve always gone for freehanded shield designs, but I think I’d go mad if I tried to replicate the shield designs you see above! So these are my first Little Big Men transfers, and I’m fairly happy with how they turned out. Things were a bit dicey when I applied black wash to the shield boss, as some of the wash decided to run underneath some imperceptible bubbles in the transfer, so I did have to go in with some paint to tidy up afterwards. Other than that, these transfers do make an average paintjob look smashing!

That’s it for now. Sorry for the long hiatus (more than a month, ouch), I don’t have as much free time as I used to and I prefer to spend it on painting instead of writing about painting. So I don’t know when the next update will follow, but rest assured – I haven’t forgotten this blog!



Adeptus Mechanicus Tech-Priest Dominus

It’s quite a mouthful, that title, but there you have it. I’ve rekindled my interest in these models, God alone knows how I did it, and I’ve finally painted up another model for this project.


Even though I initially opted for a Skitarii army I’ve been looking at the Cult Mechanicus models as well. I’ve always found that an army needs a commander model, and as Skitarii have nothing of the sort I’ve gone for this chap here.


I’ve painted him up with the same processes as on the previous models, starting out with a silver undercoat spray from Army Painter.



The red robes and the terracotta armour plates were washed with purple before being layer highlighted – it was painstaking to paint some of the areas because of the buildup of the model. And I hate subassemblies.




One area I have never been good in is painting translucent objects, such as the fluid tanks on the back of this model. I’m only partly satisfied with this, not just with the technique but also with the choice of colour. I’ll leave it this way, though; can’t be arsed to start over again.


That’s that! I still have a long way to go before I can play any sort of representative game with these guys, so I’m slowly continuing on. Next up are a few more Skitarii Vanguard to round that unit out. Not sure when they’ll be finished though – I have lots of other things I want to get off the desk first. Thanks for reading!


Tomb Banshee

I’m slowly but steadily filling up the random encounters table for Frostgrave, and it’s one I’m approaching rather piecemeal. There was a wraith in the main book, but now it seems there’s a further few ghostly types in the Lich King supplement – so I guess I’ll be using the model below fairly frequently!




I find these GW clampack character models to be fairly good – expensive but well detailed. This one was a bit tricky to put together, owing to the strange way in which it’s been cut up during development.


I worked from a white undercoat, of course, with the light colours I was aiming at. I then basecoated everything: gauss blaster green and baharroth blue for the robes, sybarite green for the bodice, flayed one flesh for the skin, celestra grey for the hair and silver for the metal.


Then, of course, a coelia greenshade wash over everything, followed by a drakenhof nightshade wash over the metal bits. Once dry I just reapplied all the base colours as a layer highlight.


Finally, I painted in the eyes and teeth with white. Super easy! I really like the way the palette came out, especially the cold flesh tone. Hope you like it too.

I have a few more updates coming soon, I just need to wrap my head around WordPress’s new publishing layout. I liked the old one much better, but then again I’m becoming an old grognard.


Warhound and Man-at-Arms for Frostgrave

Busy holidays mean a few updates get postponed, you know how it goes. Still, here’s a few Frostgrave bits and pieces that were finished some weeks back. More to come soon!


Official model by North Star.

Official model by North Star.

When I wrote up my starter warband roster for Frostgrave I always came up with 10 points to spend, and warhounds are the only option in such a case. What’s more, they’re fast and not much less fighty than your average thug or thief. These official models for Frostgrave are definitely on the expensive side, but in this case I couldn’t resist.

Quite a bit bigger than your average dog, this one has obviously been bred to survive on the streets of Felstad.

Quite a bit bigger than your average dog, this one has obviously been bred to survive on the streets of Felstad.

I painted the model more or less identically to the ‘official’ paintjob; being a cat person, I have but the vaguest idea of how a dog’s supposed to look. All in all I’m rather satisfied with how he came out, and he’s already gobbled up some thugs in my most recent games. Good boy!

An old plastic Empire Swordsman.

An old plastic Empire Swordsman.

Then there’s this chap – I found him back in my rearmost bits boxes. I’d provided him with a paintjob that had over the years become somewhat dated, to put it very mildly, and I’ve updated him with new lick of paint. It’s become a fairly thick layer with all the different coats I’ve applied to him, but I like how he came out.

Classic GW plastics: just the right amount of detail for rank and file.

Classic GW plastics: just the right amount of detail for rank and file.

I’ve added a few things of my own, such as to provide a bit of woodgrain effect to the otherwise completely flat back of the shield. It’s a simple but effective model and generic enough to go with plenty of different warband styles I have planned out.

That’s it for now. I probably won’t be covering Frostgrave this year anymore, but it’s one of the games I foresee to be playing a lot in 2016, so stay tuned!


Two Crossed Dead Frenchmen Emblazoned on a Field of Dead Frenchmen

I’ve been waiting for the opportunity to use a Blackadder quote on the blog, and now was the time. At Crisis ’15 our club is holding a massive d’Erlon – La Haye Sainte battle using the Black Powder rules, and my French must be fit for duty. So I’ve finally built some casualty markers to that end, and here they are.

Models by Perry Miniatures.

Models by Perry Miniatures.

These are casualty models which come in one of the Perry Miniatures cavalry boxes, and I was fortunate enough to have six of these lying about on the plastic pile. Fortunate, because I currently have six battalions painted. I’ve mounted these on 40mm round bases and left a gap in the tufting to allow a dice to rest there snugly. They were painted in much the same way as their living counterparts, of course.

That’s that then! I hope I won’t be needing them too much during the battle, but if history repeats itself…

Other than that, I’m expecting to be able to paint up a French marshal model as well by the time the convention happens. Just two weeks away now! I hope many of you readers will be able to attend Crisis, and if you do, look out for us – we’re the Red Baron club out of Ghent – and shake hands with your humble servant. Come one, come all!